Reblog / posted 2 days ago via watsoh with 40 notes

watsoh:

john and sherlock smoking weed tho



  • What I said:Watch this show it's really good
  • What I meant:For the love of God please watch this I need friends who understand my pain I need someone to talk about it with that hasn't heard all my opinions a billion times please I am begging you

luciawestwick:

The Imitation Game - Official UK Teaser Trailer (x)


perlockholmes:

If you think Sherlock wasn’t lonely before he met John Watson, remember that he named a skull after himself and then called it his friend.


random-nexus:

anotherwellkeptsecret:

bennyslegs:

what are they trying to tell us? i just don’t know!!! it’s so difficult! i have 0 ideas about what this could mean!!!!

[HUNGRY EYES PLAYS IN THE DISTANCE]

Well, yeah, I’m stumped, too.  It’s so subtle, whatever it is, that we’ll never figure it out, I guess.  *hears the music playing, too*


professorfangirl:

“I’m afraid that the following syllogism may be used by some in the future.
Turing believes machines think Turing lies with men Therefore machines do not think
Yours in distress, Alan”

I can’t wait for The Imitiation Game, because so, so often Turing’s homosexuality goes unmentioned in stories about his work in artificial intelligence and computing. It’s frustrating, because questions of gender and identification are right at the heart of the Turing Test: the “Imitation Game” is itself a test of the ability to think based on the ability to know gender. In “Computing Machinery and Intelligence” (1950), Turing explained the game:
"(It is) played with three people, a man (A), a woman (B), and an interrogator (C) who may be of either sex. The interrogator stays in a room apart from the other two. The object of the game for the interrogator is to determine which of the other two is the man and which is the woman….It is A’s object in the game to try and cause C to make the wrong identification." That is, the man must make the judge think that he is a woman. Then Turing asks, “‘What will happen when a machine takes the part of A [the man] in this game?’ Will the interrogator decide wrongly as often when the game is played like this as he does when the game is played between a man and a woman? These questions replace our original, ‘Can machines think?’"
So the “imitation” in the imitation game, the proof of thought, depends on the simulation, one could say the performance, of heteronormative gender roles.

This is terrifically simplified, but it suggests a tragic implication of Turing’s story: if a machine must be able to identify gender in order to think, then “Turing lies with men, therefore machines do not think” implies that because Turing cannot properly determine gender (that is, who he should be fucking), Turing cannot quite think—is, therefore, not quite fully human.

Excuse me, I’ll be over here crying.

***
(There’s a good overview of these issues in “The ‘Sinister Fruitiness’ of Machines: Neuromancer, Internet Sexuality and the Turing Test” [x])

professorfangirl:

“I’m afraid that the following syllogism may be used by some in the future.

Turing believes machines think
Turing lies with men
Therefore machines do not think

Yours in distress,
Alan”

I can’t wait for The Imitiation Game, because so, so often Turing’s homosexuality goes unmentioned in stories about his work in artificial intelligence and computing. It’s frustrating, because questions of gender and identification are right at the heart of the Turing Test: the “Imitation Game” is itself a test of the ability to think based on the ability to know gender. In “Computing Machinery and Intelligence” (1950), Turing explained the game:

"(It is) played with three people, a man (A), a woman (B), and an interrogator (C) who may be of either sex. The interrogator stays in a room apart from the other two. The object of the game for the interrogator is to determine which of the other two is the man and which is the woman….It is A’s object in the game to try and cause C to make the wrong identification." That is, the man must make the judge think that he is a woman. Then Turing asks, “‘What will happen when a machine takes the part of A [the man] in this game?’ Will the interrogator decide wrongly as often when the game is played like this as he does when the game is played between a man and a woman? These questions replace our original, ‘Can machines think?’"

So the “imitation” in the imitation game, the proof of thought, depends on the simulation, one could say the performance, of heteronormative gender roles.

This is terrifically simplified, but it suggests a tragic implication of Turing’s story: if a machine must be able to identify gender in order to think, then “Turing lies with men, therefore machines do not think” implies that because Turing cannot properly determine gender (that is, who he should be fucking), Turing cannot quite think—is, therefore, not quite fully human.

Excuse me, I’ll be over here crying.

***

(There’s a good overview of these issues in “The ‘Sinister Fruitiness’ of Machines: Neuromancer, Internet Sexuality and the Turing Test” [x])


221beemine:

thegingerbatch:

people-are-fond:

An Alternate Johnlocker’s Bingo, based on thegingerbatch's post

YOU MADE tHE tHING

OMG IS THIS SQUARE FOR ME PLEASE LET THIS SQUARE BE FOR ME

221beemine:

thegingerbatch:

people-are-fond:

An Alternate Johnlocker’s Bingo, based on thegingerbatch's post

YOU MADE tHE tHING

OMG IS THIS SQUARE FOR ME PLEASE LET THIS SQUARE BE FOR ME


silentauroriamthereal:

sherlockisthebest:

x

This man and his acting will be the death of me.


dex5m:

You know it’ll be good when the trailer hurts you like this. [X]


londonphile:

londonphile:

Benedict Cumberbatch measures up for a Madame Tussauds waxwork figure

Just days after his thirty eighth birthday and hot on the heels of an Emmy nomination for his role in Sherlock, we can reveal that one of the most exciting and talked about acting talents of his generation, Benedict Cumberbatch, will be honoured with a wax figure here at our world famous attraction later this year.

Benedict’s figure will be ‘premiere ready’, showing the actor looking impeccably groomed in a stylish dark suit. His immaculate red carpet style will be paired with a warm and relaxed expression, and his famous tousled hairstyle.

Work on the figure is well underway, and the actor has been heavily involved with the creation process. Benedict has given two sittings for our talented studios team, during which hundreds of precise measurements and numerous photographs were captured to be used by our sculptors and artists.

“Finally I can photobomb myself!” joked Cumberbatch. “What a weird and wonderful compliment to be included in the ranks of talent already committed to wax. I’ve been accused of being wooden in my work but never waxy!

“The main privilege for me was the process and seeing the amount of exacting work and skill brought to every detail of this art form. It is a wonderful combination of old and new, hi-tech and lo-fi skills. Measurements, hand inserted individual hairs and sculpted features. As a subject, you stand still surrounded by sculpters, painters, photographers, measurers and a whole army of people who bring together your likeness… it’s an extraordinary experience. Also my agents will be thrilled, they’ve wanted a clone of me for some time!” added Cumberbatch.

Ben Sweet, our General Manager, commented: “There is no denying that Benedict Cumberbatch is one of the most in-demand actors of the moment, starring in some of the most successful films and TV shows in recent times to critical and popular acclaim. With his star on a meteoric rise, we are delighted that his figure will be joining us at Madame Tussauds London. We have been lucky enough to work very closely with Benedict and his styling team to ensure that his figure is as realistic as possible. Our guests made it very clear they wanted to see him in the attraction, and we can’t wait for them to meet his figure later this year.”

Benedict’s figure will be the latest British star to join our A-list line up, and will take up residence in October, alongside fellow Brits Judi Dench and Kate Winslet, as well as a host of Hollywood names from Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, to Julia Roberts and Johnny Depp.

Did some editing to make pics prettier. I’m supposed to be working… but I’m not really shhh ;)


multifandom-madnesss:

Alan Turing - The Imitation Game [trailer



Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing

Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing



"We hadn’t plotted six episodes [when the original pilot was filmed]. We had some vague ideas of where we’d go.

So, it’s not like we had to [change] the entire thing [after the format shift to 90-minute episodes]. It’s about upping the scale of the threat.

But without giving too much away—what we’d like to do if we get some more [series commissioned] is tackle some of the favourite stuff.

And what that would mean—if we could—would be to start then making it feel like our version.

So, if anybody was to say, 'You're doing Moriarty too quickly' … It’s really about not deferring your pleasures, you know? Why wait for season five?

But what that would mean if it happened—if we did some more—is that right, this series of three could be: John gets married, as he does in the original stories. What does that do to the dynamic?

There’s so much to play around with.

The genius of Doyle is it’s all there, and sometimes it’s not quite in the right order. He admitted it himself: he married John off, and went, 'Oh, god, now I've got to do the stories retrospectively!'"

Mark Gatissbefore Sherlock was recommissioned for a second series, discussing the change from the original plan for six one-hour episodes.

(DenOfGeek.com interview, August 2010 [x])

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